Author Archives: New Moon Nursery

Plants with a Point

Nope, not spiky, thorny, spiny or prickly plants. These are plants with cardinal points. You probably read in a recent email update* about Echinacea tennesseensis ‘Rocky Top’ and the fact that its flowers always point east. The same is true with sunflowers. While researchers are still not quite sure why this is the case, there […]

Considering Root Diversity

When planning projects we are often considering diversity: the diversity of the animals who will be using them, pollinators, beneficial insects, birds, mammals; the diversity of seasonal interest: flowering time, showy fruits, good fall color, winter structure; the diversity of texture, shape and size. But have you considered the diversity of the roots of plants […]

Tallamy Plants

You all are probably are familiar with Doug Tallamy’s first book – Bringing Nature Home. If you aren’t you should be! Written in 2007, this guide to gardening for wildlife and why has become a bible for the conservation minded home gardener. An article about a book from 2007 may feel like a Throwback Thursday […]

Miss Jackson if you’re nasty…

Janet Jackson’s classic “Nasty” let people know she demanded respect. Her full name in the song is Janet Privacy Control 💪. Her first name ain’t baby. But if you are nasty you can call her Miss Jackson. If you are unsure of the reference – is that possible? – here is a video: We have […]

And the Results are In

We choose what plants we grow based on a few things, some of those considerations are: Do we like them? Do you want them? Can we grow them? Will they grow well? Do we think you should be growing them? Can we make money growing and selling them? There are many reasons you may or […]

The Shape of Flowers

Attracting pollinators and beneficial insects is an often cited reason for planting native plants. Dwindling numbers of honey bees  and  monarchs makes the news and people want to help by planting the food they like – flowers! As we know there are more insects than honey bees and monarch butterflies and many of them face […]

Native (and other) Plants for Septic Drainfields

  Many landscapes featuring native plants the one glaring exception to the diversity in seasonal color, floral display and wildlife supported is the septic drainage field. This is often identified in the landscape as a closely trimmed mound of lawn grass. The reasons lawn grasses are used here are the same reasons they do not […]

Research: Relative performance of native cultivar and wild collected seed for grassland restoration

The dearth of recent research relating to native plants, native cultivars and plugs is conspicuous. We tend to look for this type of information and share it when we find it. We aim to provide our customers and blog visitors fact-based information to help with decision making and to help provide information that will assist […]

Beyond Sedums: Native Plants for Green Roofs

Green roofs abound. Even little bird houses, like these at the Smithsonian Gardens, are popping up with their own garden rooftops. In our opinion, there are not enough yet and some serious research needs to be done in adaptive reuse, engineering and regulation for turning existing asphalt roofs into heightened oases. Whether it’s a tool […]

Other Native Plant Blogs: The Prairie Ecologist

We are a sucker for great photos. The Prairie Ecologist has great photos. Visit for the pictures. Insect pictures, flower pictures, wide mid-western prairie pictures. Stay for the words. They are all (well, mostly) contributed by Chris Helzer. Chris is the Director of Science for the Nature Conservancy in Nebraska. He documents the seasons, research, […]